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Guest Posts

The Pain of Diabetes in Morocco

The Pain of Diabetes in Morocco

Health care in Morocco is inadequate, so living with diabetes is a major handicap for some families. Illiteracy and poverty are huge barriers to a healthy life with the condition. The government and responsible organizations do not provide enough support to patients in terms of medicine or education. Read more

Venezuela Crisis: a Type 1 Diabetes Perspective

Venezuela Crisis: a Type 1 Diabetes Perspective

Having lived in Venezuela most of my life, I never had problems getting my insulin and supplies until 2012. At that time, diabetics like me began to have difficulty acquiring the supplies we needed every day, such as insulin and test strips. The Government stopped providing the pharmaceutical companies with the necessary finances in American dollars to import medicines. Read more

Finding Strength with Type 1 Diabetes in Macedonia

Finding Strength with Type 1 Diabetes in Macedonia

It was not always so easy, especially when I was facing an unfamiliar situation. Back in 1998 when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, only the insulin and needles were available free of charge. My parents had to buy the blood glucose metes, blood glucose test strips and lancets. But, after some time, the blood glucose self-testing equipment was covered for all people with diabetes. Read more

Ramadan and Responsibility

Ramadan and Responsibility

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1984, when my family lived in India, at the age of 2 years old. We later moved back to my parent’s homeland, Somalia. We then moved to England in November 1992 because of the civil war in Somalia. We came to join my dad, who was already settled here. Read more

Extreme Measures for Insulin

Extreme Measures for Insulin

I carry a machine everywhere I go. Not a phone, or a tablet, or an iPod – it’s an insulin pump. It’s connected to my body with a tiny cannula that rests under my skin, pumping a fluid through 23” of tubing. I would die without it. Read more

A Type 1 Perspective from Siberia to Moscow

A Type 1 Perspective from Siberia to Moscow

Diabetes entered in my life when I was 7 years old It was my first year in school and at the time, I was living in a small town in the southwestern part of Eastern Siberia. I consider myself lucky: my mother is a doctor and for me the transition to my new life went quite smoothly. It is only now that I understand that our family avoided many dangerous myths. Read more

My Journey to Eli Lilly HQ for Answers

My Journey to Eli Lilly HQ for Answers

I was very nervous before going to confront the top executives of Eli Lilly and Company. But I was determined to tell them Alec’s story. They needed to hear from me what their insulin prices did to Alec, and are still doing to others. Read more

Patient Activism is Seizing the Spotlight—And Rightly So

Patient Activism is Seizing the Spotlight—And Rightly So

In today’s struggle on insulin pricing and other drugs, patient can win the day again. So our organization, People of Faith for Access to Medicines, is proud to be in support of T1International’s amazing work, from the Eli Lilly demonstration to the #insulin4all meetups in New York City and the Cincinnati area. Read more

Advocates meet for #insulin4all in Cincinnati

Advocates meet for #insulin4all in Cincinnati

“Access to insulin is a human right”: this was the central theme during a gathering of #insulin4all advocates in Cincinnati on March 25th. The group came together to focus on regional action in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana regarding insulin pricing. Advocate Angela Lautner shares her perspective. Read more

Type 1 Diabetes in Burundi: A Doctor’s Perspective

Type 1 Diabetes in Burundi: A Doctor’s Perspective

Living with diabetes is very difficult in Burundi. Most of the population is poor, so it is difficult to get medicines and equipment. The average income of one type 1 patient is 100 USD and they can spend the average of 30 USD per month for medicines only. This does not include the cost of appointments and other types of care. When you live in rural zones, it is even worse. It is hard to get regular insulin and when you get it, you face the problem of not having a refrigerator to keep the insulin cool. Read more