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T1International Year in Review: 2018

T1International Year in Review: 2018

This is truly only a highlight of our proudest achievements this year, but we have worked in countless other ways to support advocacy and further our mission. We’ve held other meetings, created new resources, covered issues in new countries, been featured as Price fighting Heroes, and we are a partner in the exciting OPEN Project, adding a global access and affordability perspective to an exploration of DIY technology. Read more

Necessary Baggage: Lessons Learned in Senegal

Necessary Baggage: Lessons Learned in Senegal

It took experiencing a situation where the healthcare available felt scarily inadequate to truly internalize the medical privilege I have enjoyed throughout my life. My time in Senegal put the hardship of diabetes in perspective and helped me truly appreciate the resources that I have. Read more

Lack of Knowledge about Diabetes is Killing us

Lack of Knowledge about Diabetes is Killing us

For me, I hid myself for more than 10 years. I would have rather died than have someone find out I was diabetic. I did that because of misinterpretations from many people due to lack of knowledge about it. I had to tell my mom that no one should know that I’m diabetic unless it was necessary. As a result, those few who knew came up with a lot of their own interpretations about it. I was told many times that traditional herbs would cure me completely. Obviously, none of those worked and I am still diabetic today. Read more

Raising My Voice at Eli Lilly

Raising My Voice at Eli Lilly

The whole experience of the demonstration showed me that I am not alone. My voice was heard. My daughter said throughout the day that she met great people. She also networked and built relationships with others who are supporting family members or close friends with diabetes, just as she supports me, and it showed her that we are all going through this battle together. We all have voices that matter. Read more

Pamoja Advocacy Training in Ghana

Pamoja Advocacy Training in Ghana

‘Pamoja’ is a Swahili word that means together. This was the underpinning spirit of the advocacy training. Pamoja advocates worked together on education-focused advocacy goals throughout the training. Goals are country-specific, but similar enough that sharing and support can happen between all the advocates from each of the five countries. Read more

Crossing Borders to Afford Insulin

Crossing Borders to Afford Insulin

I certainly learned a lot buying insulin in Tijuana, but the most powerful lesson by far was that I have options, and so do other diabetics. They are not always easy, and they may take some creativity, resourcefulness, and gas money, but this is at least one more anecdotal report of an American going elsewhere for their insulin. Read more

For Life with less Pain in Croatia

For Life with less Pain in Croatia

Our initiative had no funding and we used social media to communicate effectively. We achieved our goal thanks to the persistence of people living with diabetes coming together to make a change! Read more

 A Parent's Perspective on Struggling with Insulin Costs

A Parent's Perspective on Struggling with Insulin Costs

I am not insulin dependent. My daughter Hattie has type 1 diabetes, and shares her story of using another person’s insulin. She lives with the condition day in and day out, but I – like so many others – live under the strain of the financial and emotional turmoil caused by the essential need for my family to get and afford insulin. Read more

The Pain of Diabetes in Morocco

The Pain of Diabetes in Morocco

Health care in Morocco is inadequate, so living with diabetes is a major handicap for some families. Illiteracy and poverty are huge barriers to a healthy life with the condition. The government and responsible organizations do not provide enough support to patients in terms of medicine or education. Read more

Venezuela Crisis: a Type 1 Diabetes Perspective

Venezuela Crisis: a Type 1 Diabetes Perspective

Having lived in Venezuela most of my life, I never had problems getting my insulin and supplies until 2012. At that time, diabetics like me began to have difficulty acquiring the supplies we needed every day, such as insulin and test strips. The Government stopped providing the pharmaceutical companies with the necessary finances in American dollars to import medicines. Read more