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Fighting in Micah's Memory

Fighting in Micah's Memory

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I am the mother of Micah Fischer, who had type 1 diabetes and died November 4, 2018 at the age of 26 because he was rationing his insulin.

I am writing this because I want people to know what a wonderful person Micah was and that this should never have happened. Micah was the most amazing son, brother, nephew, cousin and friend to all who knew him. He died way too soon and for no good reason.

Micah’s insurance wouldn't cover Humalog, although it worked best for him and was recommended by his doctor. His insurance only covered Novalog, which made him sick. His doctor wrote multiple letters, made phone calls, but none of it helped. We were shocked, but without insurance, to fill his Humalog prescription cost him $1200. That would have lasted him approximately one week depending on his carbohydrate intake.

So, Micah rationed his Novalog not only because it made him sick, but because he had difficulty affording both it and the Humalog. As a result of his rationing, Micah ended up in a diabetic coma from which he could not be revived, despite hours of efforts by many medical staff. He died that night at the age of 26.

Another painful part of this story is that Micah had just started a new job which offered insurance that would have covered the Humalog he needed. The problem is he had to be employed and working for one month before the insurance coverage would begin. He only had two and a half weeks left until his new insurance kicked in when he died.

In order to prevent this from ever happening again in the future, we need to raise awareness everywhere that this is happening more and more. I was just told about a family in Texas who experienced the exact same thing we did. The person who died was also 26. Since the most recent deaths are 26 year olds who have been kicked off their parents insurance, I believe a change in insurance regulations is needed. Insurance should be accessible, acceptable, and affordable for everyone!

I also believe the pharmaceutical and insurance companies work together for their own good and not for the people who really need them. It seems that these companies pay government officials off to keep it all quiet. Insulin companies should not be able to monopolize production. Companies should be accountable and transparent, proving to us why they believe they need to raise prices. As you can tell, I am angry and outraged because this greed cost my son his life.

Despite my anger, it is important that you know a bit more about Micah. He never let his diabetes slow him down. While still in school, he mentored other kids with diabetes. He helped and encouraged them, and they looked up to him. When a cousin was diagnosed, he never missed a diabetes walk with him, even if it meant driving through the night after a 12-hour shift at work. Micah was an incredible human being. He had a big heart and loved life despite the struggles.

I want to thank T1International and all the volunteers for the work they do. I ask you to please remember my son as you continue to fight to make this STOP! No lives, young or old, should be cut short for lack of medicine that would allow people to survive and live productively. Our family should never have had to face such pain at the loss of Micah, nor should the countless others who have lost someone. This is a completely preventable horror story.

I know Micah would want things changed so others wouldn’t have to go through what he did. Whatever we can do to make life better, not just for people with type 1 diabetes, but for ALL people, Micah would want us to do that.

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